Unique Classics – 1954 Ford Ambulance

At first glance, you might not recognize one of these Highland Green sedans for what they are other than a classic car. The 1954 Ford National was a full-service ambulance outfitted with the best modern medicine could offer such a vehicle in 1954. It’s green color, short stature, and similar look to many other Ford sedans on the road at that time are a far cry from the boxy, white and orange vans that barrel down the roads today. If you look more closely though, you’ll spot the telltale lights and siren of a classic ambulance. (more…)

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Get smart (car)

Looking for a small, fuel-efficient, stylish car to drive around the city? Consider the smart. At just over eight feet long, the smart car can zip down tiny one-way streets and slip into itty-bitty parking spaces at the grocery store. (more…)

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Trabant – East Germany’s Finest

Small, boxy, and smoky, the Trabant was the people’s car in East Germany – the answer to West Germany’s Volkswagen. At eighteen horsepower with a two-stroke engine that billowed dark smoke and topping out at a whopping speed of sixty-eight miles per hour, it’s amazing anyone ever bought a Trabant. But buy them people did…for over thirty years from 1958 to 1991. (more…)

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The Subaru Impreza WRX, Modified

While Rally racing has been popular around the world for years, only in the early 2000s did the USA get it’s first production cars based on Rally-spec vehicles. The WRX was the first glimse at this world of high performance all-wheel drive compact racers. Even though purists were disappointed that we didn’t get the STI, WRXs quickly sold for a premium around the nation. (more…)

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Under Appreciated Used Cars – The Saturn

In the mid 1980’s there was a fear of Japanese manufacturing. They seemed to be able to produce better cars, more efficiently at a lower cost then the United States could. General Motors felt like they were behind the eight ball, and an idea was circulated to try making a different type of car, with a different manufacturing and sales process. The result of that was Saturn. (more…)

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The Westmoreland Volkswagen Rabbit

In the late 70s, otherwise known as the dark ages by car buffs (I’m looking at you 165 horsepower Corvette) gas mileage became king. This was the time for the small cars that were already so pervasive in Europe to make their mark on the American market. To take advantage of this, Volkswagen brought over it’s Golf in 1975 to the United States and called it the Rabbit. The car became popular because of it’s European styling and handling, and in 1977 Volkswagen opened a plant in the United States to take advantage of the cost savings in producing the high volume, low cost cars directly in the states. (more…)

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